The Plant Store is now closed for 2023 and will re-open for sales in May of 2024

  • Please see the Using the Plant Library  page  for some tips on how to make the most of the information here to select species for creating a healthy native plant community suited to the conditions of your site.

Monarda fistulosa, Wild Bergamot: Tall, Late

Monarda fistulosa 

Wild Bergamot

  • Full sun to light shade
  • Average moisture and soil fertility
  • 5' to 6' tall, plant 2' to 3' apart, spreads to form a patch
  • Garden, meadow and woodland settings

There are two listings for Monarda Fistulosa on this site this year. This listing is for the tallest, latest blooming strain. These generally come into bloom in mid to late August and bloom well into September and occasionally early October. They grow to 5' to 6' in height and are the most competitive strain, doing very well in meadow settings and other areas with plenty of root competition.

The other strain on offer, listed separately, is the mid height, July to August blooming plants.

This species is very widely distributed from Quebec west to BC and is popular in wildflower gardens. It is enjoyed by many different pollinator species, humming birds and herbalists (the leaves and the flowers are quite nice in herbal teas/tisanes).
Depending on the seed source, plant height can be anywhere between 2’ and 5’, the ones that I have available this year are toward the taller end of that range. The shorter strains tend to bloom in July, with the taller ones blooming in August and September. 
I’ve planted them in sun and in part shade, and in garden soil and an unenriched meadow area and they seem to have adapted well to all of these variations in conditions.
As a member of the mint family this does like to spread a bit, but can be kept to a limited patch through divisions, which are generally easy to gift to other aspiring butterfly, hummingbird and native plant enthusiasts, or by planting them alongside other species with similar traits, including some of the goldenrods, obedient plant and sundrops.
Like other Monardas, these are susceptible to mildew when stressed, although I have only seen it on the plants in the garden, and not in the meadow, so setting does matter. Moisture levels also matter, although not in the way that is usually associated with fungal issues. When Monardas are grown in a location, or a season, that is consistently moist, they rarely develop mildew. In a hot, dry summer, mildew often appears a few days after the first time the plant wilts.


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Species that were not sown / aren't being sown for 2023 are marked with an * 
Species that are native to this continent, but not historically native to Ontario are marked with a ~ 
While it rarely comes up, I do reserve the right to limit plant quantities, mostly to help ensure that as many native plant gardens as possible become a reality
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