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The Online Plant Nursery is now Closed for the Season

I Will be Holding a Second Sale in The Fall
The fall plants will be the seedlings that I’ve planted out in the large gardens I care for outside of Perth (not open to the public!) taking up some of the space that would otherwise be filled with vegetables. I’ll care for them over the summer and post an availability list and photos and then do a big dig when the weather cools. These will be field dug plants, tucked into temporary/re-used containers and they will need to be planted right away. This is old fashioned nursery practices, when planting was a seasonal undertaking and we worked to the weather. 
The fall plant pricing is something that I’ll work out over the summer based on time and any material inputs. 

In the meantime, I have made all of the plant listings from this spring's sale visible so that those who ordered plants can view their descriptions. Some of these same species will be included in the fall sale, depending on how well they do over the summer.

I expect to update this page with the fall availability in mid to late September.

For those who picked up seedlings this spring, their planting instructions can be found here.
Verbena hastata Verbena hastata
Verbena hastata
Verbena hastata

Verbena hastata

Some ready to go now, more available starting June 1st

Verbena hastata

Blue Vervain

Another native plant that simply arrived in the garden one day. -One of the many benefits of only pulling the ‘weeds’ once I know who they area.
They grow to around 30” to 50” in the urban garden beds or the country vegetable garden. In the dry meadow they are a bit less vigorous, reaching around 18” to 30”.
The candelabra of little purple-blue flowers are an early July to early August affair, working their way up from bottom to top like a slow burning firework. The pollinators seem to enjoy the blooms and various small critters dine on tiny bites of their leaves, which the plants don’t seem to be fussed by at all. These Verbena really don’t seem to expect anything of me, care wise. I do gather and distribute their seeds though. I like to share the joy.
With their variable height, I suspect that these would exceed 5’ in a mixed, wet meadow setting, since moisture levels seem to be the primary factor in exuberance of growth.
Much like Rudbeckia hirta, these can bloom in the first year from seed, especially if started a bit early and then transplanted to the garden when the weather warms.
I’d say that these would easily blend into a perennial border or English style garden. They also do very well in waterside restoration plantings.